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The Comprehensive Guide to Metalworking Fluid (MWF)

Metalworking fluids (MWFs), including coolants, lubricants, corrosion inhibitors, and cleaners, are used in machining and grinding operations to remove chips from the cutting zone, improve surface-finishes, and promote or improve tool life. Choosing the right metalworking fluid can double tool life and improve the performance of metalworking machines by…

Reducing friction between the metal and cutting tool
Cooling the workpiece and cutting or forming tools
Protecting machinery and workpiece from corrosion
Improving productivity with higher speeds and feeds
Reducing machine wear and downtime

Investing in a high-quality metalworking fluid is highly beneficial to many aspects of your company, including parts quality, health and safety, and the bottom line. Though metalworking fluids are an integral part of the machining process, some manufacturers chose an inexpensive MWF to save money on a line item. This is, in fact, a false economy. As the cost of MWF is a factor that ranges from 0.03% to less than 1% of a manufacturing facility's budget, finding the right MWF actually lowers other costs because it impacts everything in production, from machines to parts to operators.

The following sections outline a part’s journey through the shop, from the moment it enters as a raw material, to the moment it reaches your customer. Metalworking fluids are there to enhance the process every step of the way.

A Part's Journey

Metal Arrives in Plant


All types of metal are machined and worked in plants across various industries, from expensive alloys in the aerospace and automotive industries to the stainless steel used in the medical industry. Each metal has different requirements when it comes to metalworking fluids which can often be a little confusing. We’re here to help you find the right fluids for your specific metal.

Types of Metal

The main metal groups including steels, stainless steels, cast irons, nonferrous metals, superalloys, and hardened steels are represented by their ISO group letter and color, indicating that the metal you are using is certified by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) and therefore, of high quality and standard.

P

Supporting our towns, cities, and transportation infrastructure, most large structures we see today are supported by steel frames. That’s because steel is non-combustible and is extremely durable and strong, making it a safe and reliable choice for buildings and infrastructure.

  • Working with Steel

Steel is typically a metal that is very machinable, but as this is such a large metal group, there is some variation in machinability. Machining steel, as with all metals, is about striking the perfect balance between machining the workpiece as quickly as possible without generating too much heat and stress to the machine tool and part. With steel, a good indication that that balance has been achieved is when the steel chips are blue in color, indicating that not too much heat was generated but enough that the highest potential working speed was met.

  • Metalworking Fluid

Typically when machining steel, cooling is more important than lubrication, making a synthetic or semisynthetic the right choice of coolant depending on the hardness of the metal being worked.

To find exactly the right metalworking fluid for your steel operation, contact Master Fluid Solutions here.

P

Supporting our towns, cities, and transportation infrastructure, most large structures we see today are supported by steel frames. That’s because steel is non-combustible and is extremely durable and strong, making it a safe and reliable choice for buildings and infrastructure.

  • Working with Steel

Steel is typically a metal that is very machinable, but as this is such a large metal group, there is some variation in machinability. Machining steel, as with all metals, is about striking the perfect balance between machining the workpiece as quickly as possible without generating too much heat and stress to the machine tool and part. With steel, a good indication that that balance has been achieved is when the steel chips are blue in color, indicating that not too much heat was generated but enough that the highest potential working speed was met.

  • Metalworking Fluid

Typically when machining steel, cooling is more important than lubrication, making a synthetic or semisynthetic the right choice of coolant depending on the hardness of the metal being worked.

To find exactly the right metalworking fluid for your steel operation, contact Master Fluid Solutions here.

M

Stainless steel is extremely resistant to corrosion and strong acids and is used to create implements that need to be free of tarnishes such as medical instruments and kitchen utensils. There are five main groups of stainless steel, each with its own unique crystalline structure: austenitic, ferritic, martensitic, precipitation hardenable, and duplex. The different types within each group represent a unique composition of iron, carbon, chromium, and other materials. Esters, sulfur, and chlorine are great lubricity additives for stainless steel, especially when the metal is especially gummy.

  • Austenitic

Austenitic stainless steels are the most common group around the world, representing two-thirds of all stainless steel. The most commonly machined types are S304 and S316. Austenitic stainless steels vary from very gummy to easily machined. When it comes to choosing an MWF, we typically recommend one of our high-oil MicroSol microemulsions to accommodate austenitic stainless steel’s wide range of machinability.

  • Ferritic

The second most common stainless steels are ferritic stainless steels, with the most commonly used types being S409 and S430. Ferritic stainless steels have a similar machining behavior to a steel alloy. When machining this metal, cooling is the primary concern. For that reason, we typically recommend a synthetic or low-oil semisynthetic coolant.

  • Martensitic

Less common and less corrosion-resistant than the austenitic and ferritic stainless steels, martensitic stainless steels are extremely hard, make very fine chips, and are abrasive. The most commonly used types of martensitic stainless steel are S416 and S420. When choosing an MWF for this type of metal, we typically recommend a coolant with a higher oil content, such as one of our emulsions or MicroSol microemulsions.

  • Precipitation Hardenable

Primarily used in aerospace and energy markets, precipitation hardenable stainless steels (or age-hardening steels) are extremely strong due to their crystalline structures. The most common types of precipitation hardenable stainless steels are 15-5PH and 17-4PH. This type of metal varies considerably from gummy to hard depending on the treatment. When machining precipitation hardenable stainless steels, we typically recommend using a MicroSol microemulsion with a high oil content.

  • Duplex

The rarest group of stainless steels are duplex stainless steels, the most common type being 2205. This group of stainless steel combines the microstructures of austenitic and ferritic stainless steel at a ratio of around 50:50. This combination of the two crystalline structures gives it twice as much yield strength as austenitic stainless steel. However, this metal group is extremely difficult to machine. When choosing a MWF for duplex stainless steels, we typically recommend a coolant with a higher oil content, such as one of our emulsions or MicroSol microemulsions.

To find exactly the right metalworking fluid for your stainless steel operation, contact Master Fluid Solutions here.

M

Stainless steel is extremely resistant to corrosion and strong acids and is used to create implements that need to be free of tarnishes such as medical instruments and kitchen utensils. There are five main groups of stainless steel, each with its own unique crystalline structure: austenitic, ferritic, martensitic, precipitation hardenable, and duplex. The different types within each group represent a unique composition of iron, carbon, chromium, and other materials. Esters, sulfur, and chlorine are great lubricity additives for stainless steel, especially when the metal is especially gummy.

  • Austenitic

Austenitic stainless steels are the most common group around the world, representing two-thirds of all stainless steel. The most commonly machined types are S304 and S316. Austenitic stainless steels vary from very gummy to easily machined. When it comes to choosing an MWF, we typically recommend one of our high-oil MicroSol microemulsions to accommodate austenitic stainless steel’s wide range of machinability.

  • Ferritic

The second most common stainless steels are ferritic stainless steels, with the most commonly used types being S409 and S430. Ferritic stainless steels have a similar machining behavior to a steel alloy. When machining this metal, cooling is the primary concern. For that reason, we typically recommend a synthetic or low-oil semisynthetic coolant.

  • Martensitic

Less common and less corrosion-resistant than the austenitic and ferritic stainless steels, martensitic stainless steels are extremely hard, make very fine chips, and are abrasive. The most commonly used types of martensitic stainless steel are S416 and S420. When choosing an MWF for this type of metal, we typically recommend a coolant with a higher oil content, such as one of our emulsions or MicroSol microemulsions.

  • Precipitation Hardenable

Primarily used in aerospace and energy markets, precipitation hardenable stainless steels (or age-hardening steels) are extremely strong due to their crystalline structures. The most common types of precipitation hardenable stainless steels are 15-5PH and 17-4PH. This type of metal varies considerably from gummy to hard depending on the treatment. When machining precipitation hardenable stainless steels, we typically recommend using a MicroSol microemulsion with a high oil content.

  • Duplex

The rarest group of stainless steels are duplex stainless steels, the most common type being 2205. This group of stainless steel combines the microstructures of austenitic and ferritic stainless steel at a ratio of around 50:50. This combination of the two crystalline structures gives it twice as much yield strength as austenitic stainless steel. However, this metal group is extremely difficult to machine. When choosing a MWF for duplex stainless steels, we typically recommend a coolant with a higher oil content, such as one of our emulsions or MicroSol microemulsions.

To find exactly the right metalworking fluid for your stainless steel operation, contact Master Fluid Solutions here.

K

Cast iron is an iron alloy composed of around 96% iron, around 2% carbon, and 2% silicon as well as small amounts of other materials. Melted in a cupola furnace, the metal is poured into molds where it solidifies. Though not as tough as steel, cast iron is a rigid metal, is highly resistant to deformation, and is very absorbent to vibrations, making it a great material for infrastructure.

  • Working with Cast Iron

As a rigid metal, cast iron is not an easy metal to machine, quickly becoming hard, brittle, and unmalleable. When machining iron, typically very fine chips are produced that are dust-like in quality making the machining of this metal a rather messy process.

  • Metalworking Fluid

Cooling is key when it comes to choosing an MWF for cast iron machining operations. Lubrication is of far less importance due to the graphite contained in cast iron that makes this metal self-lubricating. Another important factor to consider when choosing a lubricant is finding one that doesn’t smut from graphite accumulation. We typically recommend a semisynthetic or low-oil synthetic when machining cast iron.

To find exactly the right metalworking fluid for your cast iron operation, contact Master Fluid Solutions here.

K

Cast iron is an iron alloy composed of around 96% iron, around 2% carbon, and 2% silicon as well as small amounts of other materials. Melted in a cupola furnace, the metal is poured into molds where it solidifies. Though not as tough as steel, cast iron is a rigid metal, is highly resistant to deformation, and is very absorbent to vibrations, making it a great material for infrastructure.

  • Working with Cast Iron

As a rigid metal, cast iron is not an easy metal to machine, quickly becoming hard, brittle, and unmalleable. When machining iron, typically very fine chips are produced that are dust-like in quality making the machining of this metal a rather messy process.

  • Metalworking Fluid

Cooling is key when it comes to choosing an MWF for cast iron machining operations. Lubrication is of far less importance due to the graphite contained in cast iron that makes this metal self-lubricating. Another important factor to consider when choosing a lubricant is finding one that doesn’t smut from graphite accumulation. We typically recommend a semisynthetic or low-oil synthetic when machining cast iron.

To find exactly the right metalworking fluid for your cast iron operation, contact Master Fluid Solutions here.

N

Nonferrous metals are metals that contain no iron, making them completely resistant to rust. These metals include aluminum, yellow metals, and magnesium-based alloys.

  • Aluminum and Aluminum Alloys

Used in household appliances, vehicles, and constructions, aluminum and aluminum alloys are typically gummy and need a lot of lubrication. When choosing an MWF, aluminums are best machined with straight oils, high-oil MicroSol microemulsions, and emulsions. Esters and chlorine are great lubricity additives for aluminum and when choosing a metalworking fluid for an aluminum alloy, be sure to choose a coolant that is compatible with the grading to avoid staining.

  • Yellow Metals

Yellow metals, including brass, bronze, copper, and copper-tin, are typically gummy and are difficult to machine. When machining copper and copper alloys, copper can accumulate in the metalworking fluid causing oil-based MWFs to split prematurely. In synthetics, this manifests itself as green-blue residue that will plate out and accumulate over your machine tool. When machining leaded yellow metals, avoid using chlorinated products as this can result in rock-hard residue. For occasional machining, MicroSol microemulsions and semisynthetics typically work well with yellow metals. If yellow metals are your primary metal, contact Master Fluid Solutions to receive specific recommendations.

  • Magnesium-based Alloys

Magnesium-based alloys are easy to machine. However, there are many hazards associated with machining this metal. Before applying any type of metalworking fluid to this flammable metal, contact Master Fluid Solutions.

To find exactly the right metalworking fluid for your nonferrous metal operation, contact Master Fluid Solutions here.

N

Nonferrous metals are metals that contain no iron, making them completely resistant to rust. These metals include aluminum, yellow metals, and magnesium-based alloys.

  • Aluminum and Aluminum Alloys

Used in household appliances, vehicles, and constructions, aluminum and aluminum alloys are typically gummy and need a lot of lubrication. When choosing an MWF, aluminums are best machined with straight oils, high-oil MicroSol microemulsions, and emulsions. Esters and chlorine are great lubricity additives for aluminum and when choosing a metalworking fluid for an aluminum alloy, be sure to choose a coolant that is compatible with the grading to avoid staining.

  • Yellow Metals

Yellow metals, including brass, bronze, copper, and copper-tin, are typically gummy and are difficult to machine. When machining copper and copper alloys, copper can accumulate in the metalworking fluid causing oil-based MWFs to split prematurely. In synthetics, this manifests itself as green-blue residue that will plate out and accumulate over your machine tool. When machining leaded yellow metals, avoid using chlorinated products as this can result in rock-hard residue. For occasional machining, MicroSol microemulsions and semisynthetics typically work well with yellow metals. If yellow metals are your primary metal, contact Master Fluid Solutions to receive specific recommendations.

  • Magnesium-based Alloys

Magnesium-based alloys are easy to machine. However, there are many hazards associated with machining this metal. Before applying any type of metalworking fluid to this flammable metal, contact Master Fluid Solutions.

To find exactly the right metalworking fluid for your nonferrous metal operation, contact Master Fluid Solutions here.

S

With high corrosion and creep resistance, superalloys, also known as high-performance alloys, are stronger and more durable than standard alloys, and are able to operate at a high fraction of their melting point. Being heat resistant makes them perfect for the aerospace and energy industries.

  • Superalloys

Two well-known brands of superalloy are Inconel® and Incoloy®, both of which are used primarily in the aerospace, automotive, energy, and naval industries. Superalloys are typically difficult to work with as they generate heat, are abrasive, get harder while being worked on, and can be sticky, creating built-up edge on the workpiece. Higher lubricity is typically recommended for super alloys including MicroSol microemulsions and emulsions. A chlorine additive can also be beneficial when machining superalloys, though chlorine additives are typically not permitted in aerospace manufacturing.

  • Titanium Alloys

With outstanding corrosion resistance, titanium alloys are used both in air and sea transportation industries as well as in the medical industry. Titanium is strong, light, and extremely heat resistant and is the metal of choice in air- and space crafts as well as missiles. This group of non-magnetic metal is also used for hip replacements and other medical and dental prosthetics and implants due to its durability. Not only is titanium a very expensive metal and therefore requires utmost care when machining, it is also very difficult to machine, losing only around 25% heat in the chips. The rest of the heat stays in the workpiece and the machine tool creating a very unique challenge when machining titanium - it needs a metalworking fluid that is both extremely lubricative and extremely cooling. To strike this perfect balance between lubricating and cooling, we recommend a MicroSol microemulsion.

To find exactly the right metalworking fluid for your superalloy operation, contact Master Fluid Solutions here.

S

With high corrosion and creep resistance, superalloys, also known as high-performance alloys, are stronger and more durable than standard alloys, and are able to operate at a high fraction of their melting point. Being heat resistant makes them perfect for the aerospace and energy industries.

  • Superalloys

Two well-known brands of superalloy are Inconel® and Incoloy®, both of which are used primarily in the aerospace, automotive, energy, and naval industries. Superalloys are typically difficult to work with as they generate heat, are abrasive, get harder while being worked on, and can be sticky, creating built-up edge on the workpiece. Higher lubricity is typically recommended for super alloys including MicroSol microemulsions and emulsions. A chlorine additive can also be beneficial when machining superalloys, though chlorine additives are typically not permitted in aerospace manufacturing.

  • Titanium Alloys

With outstanding corrosion resistance, titanium alloys are used both in air and sea transportation industries as well as in the medical industry. Titanium is strong, light, and extremely heat resistant and is the metal of choice in air- and space crafts as well as missiles. This group of non-magnetic metal is also used for hip replacements and other medical and dental prosthetics and implants due to its durability. Not only is titanium a very expensive metal and therefore requires utmost care when machining, it is also very difficult to machine, losing only around 25% heat in the chips. The rest of the heat stays in the workpiece and the machine tool creating a very unique challenge when machining titanium - it needs a metalworking fluid that is both extremely lubricative and extremely cooling. To strike this perfect balance between lubricating and cooling, we recommend a MicroSol microemulsion.

To find exactly the right metalworking fluid for your superalloy operation, contact Master Fluid Solutions here.

H

Hardened steel is carbon steel that has been treated through a process called quenching which involves heating and cooling carbon steel to create an extremely hard, robust metal that is almost impossible to break. Used for power tools and machine manufacturing, medical instruments, and automotive parts, hardened steel can be put under huge amounts of continuous physical stress and abrasion and still stay strong.

  • Working with Hardened Steel

As a hardened metal, machining hardened steel can be difficult, generating a large amount of heat and damaging the cutting edge.

  • Metalworking Fluid

To find exactly the right metalworking fluid for your hardened steel operation, contact Master Fluid Solutions here.

H

Hardened steel is carbon steel that has been treated through a process called quenching which involves heating and cooling carbon steel to create an extremely hard, robust metal that is almost impossible to break. Used for power tools and machine manufacturing, medical instruments, and automotive parts, hardened steel can be put under huge amounts of continuous physical stress and abrasion and still stay strong.

  • Working with Hardened Steel

As a hardened metal, machining hardened steel can be difficult, generating a large amount of heat and damaging the cutting edge.

  • Metalworking Fluid

To find exactly the right metalworking fluid for your hardened steel operation, contact Master Fluid Solutions here.

Metal is Shaped into a Part



When it’s time to cut or form the metal into a part, two factors are considered - the type of metal being machined and the operation being performed. Knowing this information helps in choosing the best coolant for your CNC machine, whether it be a synthetic, semisynthetic, microemulsion, emulsion, straight oil, or neo-synthetic.

Metalworking Operations

To create the final product, many different metalworking processes may take place to get your part functional and to a high-quality finish. These operations create the part, mostly through machining, grinding, and forming.

A coolant with more lubricity is preferable in specific operations, such as low-speed activities like broaching or using a large-diameter tap. Conversely, a coolant offering enhanced cooling properties is more suitable for the high-speed turning of hardened steel parts. Since coolant interacts with every cutting tool, finding the best CNC coolant for your shop is vital. Watch our video below to find out more about choosing the right metalworking fluid for your specific operation.



Machining metal is a metal removal process that encompasses many different operations:

  • Turning: While the part turns, a sharp tool makes a linear movement, making contact with the tuning part to shape it.
  • Surface milling: A rotating cutting tool comes into contact with the part, removing precise amounts of metal.
  • Drilling: A rotating cutting tool creates a hole in the part.
  • Threading: A tool is used to cut the thread around a part such as a screw.
  • Tapping: A rotating tool is used to create a thread in a part’s hole where another object can be screwed in.
  • Sawing: A toothed blade either rotates or moves backward and forwards cutting the workpiece.

When metalworking tools start to wear down, the end product may not meet tolerance specifications, and the machine itself may require repairs due to excessive spindle vibration. The right cutting fluid can increase tool life by 214% and improve the performance of metalworking machines by reducing friction, cooling and clearing the chip zone, curtailing corrosion, and cutting down on residue formation. In optimal conditions, using the right cutting fluid can even reduce tool wear at higher cutting speeds.

Here’s a breakdown of typical challenges manufacturers may face when using the wrong cutting fluid:

  • The problem with foam: Using the wrong metalworking fluid can create foam. If you have fine foam that looks like shaving cream, that’s caused mechanically by pumps or machines. Foam can be difficult to break up and run coolant out on the floor, creating a safety concern around the machine. The other problem caused by foam is that, if you try to cut with it, it will not carry the heat away from the tool and cause it to wear down faster.
  • Rusting machinery: Another problem that can arise with the wrong or low-quality metalworking fluid is that it can create rust on the machinery. Corrosion can form anywhere on the machine and also on the metal being machined.
  • Sticky switches: Poor metalworking fluid can also leave residue on the machine. This can cause the plates to get sticky and gum up the switches. If it gets really bad, the residue can build up in tool holders and the tools could fall out, slowing production, breaking inserts or drill tips on the tools, and potentially injuring workers.
  • Foul odors: While odors aren’t strictly related to machine performance, it does affect operator performance, which in turn impacts production. The odor might be caused by the metalworking fluid itself, or from the machining lubricants leaking into the coolant. Metalworking fluids tend to start smelling bad as it ages, not maintained properly, and as workers treat sumps poorly by using it as a substitute for a trash can or spittoon. The metalworking fluid used needs to resist contamination to prevent this performance issue.

Learn more about the range of MWF fluids we offer for your machining operation by clicking a metal below:

P Steel

M Stainless Steel

K Cast Iron

N Nonferrous

S Superalloys

Want to get your machining operation running cleaner, faster, and more efficiently? Click here to get in touch with your nearest distributor who will find just the right metalworking fluid for your operation.

Expand your knowledge while improving your bottom line - check out our selection of machining blog articles here.

Machining metal is a metal removal process that encompasses many different operations:

  • Turning: While the part turns, a sharp tool makes a linear movement, making contact with the tuning part to shape it.
  • Surface milling: A rotating cutting tool comes into contact with the part, removing precise amounts of metal.
  • Drilling: A rotating cutting tool creates a hole in the part.
  • Threading: A tool is used to cut the thread around a part such as a screw.
  • Tapping: A rotating tool is used to create a thread in a part’s hole where another object can be screwed in.
  • Sawing: A toothed blade either rotates or moves backward and forwards cutting the workpiece.

When metalworking tools start to wear down, the end product may not meet tolerance specifications, and the machine itself may require repairs due to excessive spindle vibration. The right cutting fluid can increase tool life by 214% and improve the performance of metalworking machines by reducing friction, cooling and clearing the chip zone, curtailing corrosion, and cutting down on residue formation. In optimal conditions, using the right cutting fluid can even reduce tool wear at higher cutting speeds.

Here’s a breakdown of typical challenges manufacturers may face when using the wrong cutting fluid:

  • The problem with foam: Using the wrong metalworking fluid can create foam. If you have fine foam that looks like shaving cream, that’s caused mechanically by pumps or machines. Foam can be difficult to break up and run coolant out on the floor, creating a safety concern around the machine. The other problem caused by foam is that, if you try to cut with it, it will not carry the heat away from the tool and cause it to wear down faster.
  • Rusting machinery: Another problem that can arise with the wrong or low-quality metalworking fluid is that it can create rust on the machinery. Corrosion can form anywhere on the machine and also on the metal being machined.
  • Sticky switches: Poor metalworking fluid can also leave residue on the machine. This can cause the plates to get sticky and gum up the switches. If it gets really bad, the residue can build up in tool holders and the tools could fall out, slowing production, breaking inserts or drill tips on the tools, and potentially injuring workers.
  • Foul odors: While odors aren’t strictly related to machine performance, it does affect operator performance, which in turn impacts production. The odor might be caused by the metalworking fluid itself, or from the machining lubricants leaking into the coolant. Metalworking fluids tend to start smelling bad as it ages, not maintained properly, and as workers treat sumps poorly by using it as a substitute for a trash can or spittoon. The metalworking fluid used needs to resist contamination to prevent this performance issue.

Learn more about the range of MWF fluids we offer for your machining operation by clicking a metal below:

P Steel

M Stainless Steel

K Cast Iron

N Nonferrous

S Superalloys

Want to get your machining operation running cleaner, faster, and more efficiently? Click here to get in touch with your nearest distributor who will find just the right metalworking fluid for your operation.

Expand your knowledge while improving your bottom line - check out our selection of machining blog articles here.

Grinding is another metal removal process that encompasses many different operations:

  • Plain grinding: Using an abrasive grinding wheel, grinding is a metalworking process that results in accurately sized parts.
  • Blanchard: When grinding oversized parts, a heavy-duty Blanchard machine is used to remove large amounts of metal, focusing on size over precision.
  • Form grinding: This involves using an abrasive grinding wheel that is shaped to grind the workpiece into the exact shape of the final part.
  • Form cylindrical Typically used in grinding operations for cylindrical parts, form cylindrical grinding uses a specialized grinding wheel shaped to fit the part.

Some of the most common challenges in grinding operations manifest as issues with workpiece surface finish, productivity, material costs, and tolerances. Regardless of the cause of these problems, simply upgrading to the right cutting and grinding fluid can dramatically improve grinding processes.

Here’s a breakdown of typical challenges manufacturers may face and how the right cutting fluid can combat them:

  • Poor or inconsistent surface finish: Grinding is often a part finishing process, and it can be difficult to pinpoint the exact cause of poor finish quality in a grinding operation since it could be caused by previous operations. Switching to higher-quality cutting fluid optimized for precision grinding operations can help alleviate many finish quality issues. Fluids with higher lubricity can help grinding wheels achieve a smoother, more polished finish. They also keep grinding wheels clean and minimize the need for wheel dressings.
  • Burning: Thermal damage, or burning, manifests in a variety of ways, including discoloration on the workpiece, surface distortions on the part, and even workpiece hardness. To avoid this threat to productivity, try switching to a cutting fluid with more advanced cooling and lubricity. With a high-performance grinding fluid, operators may be able to increase feed rates or depth of cut, both of which increase productivity.
  • Short wheel life: If the grinding wheel is too hard, too soft, or otherwise mismatched to the material being machined, the wheel could load up or break down faster, resulting in unnecessary machine downtime and higher consumable costs. The right grinding fluid is also essential to maximizing wheel life, as the wrong one could lack the necessary lubricity and cooling.
  • Short fluid life: Grinding operations can create a lot of swarf which can build up in the fluid tanks if not filtered properly. This swarf buildup can lead to bacteria issues and contaminate the grinding fluid quickly. Poor sump life also presents several productivity and material cost issues.

Learn more about the range of MWF fluids we offer for your grinding operation by clicking a metal below:

P Steel

M Stainless Steel

K Cast Iron

N Nonferrous

S Superalloys

Want to get your grinding operation running cleaner, faster, and more efficiently? Click here to get in touch with your nearest distributor who will find just the right metalworking fluid for your operation.

Expand your knowledge while improving your bottom line - check out our selection of grinding blog articles here.

Grinding is another metal removal process that encompasses many different operations:

  • Plain grinding: Using an abrasive grinding wheel, grinding is a metalworking process that results in accurately sized parts.
  • Blanchard: When grinding oversized parts, a heavy-duty Blanchard machine is used to remove large amounts of metal, focusing on size over precision.
  • Form grinding: This involves using an abrasive grinding wheel that is shaped to grind the workpiece into the exact shape of the final part.
  • Form cylindrical Typically used in grinding operations for cylindrical parts, form cylindrical grinding uses a specialized grinding wheel shaped to fit the part.

Some of the most common challenges in grinding operations manifest as issues with workpiece surface finish, productivity, material costs, and tolerances. Regardless of the cause of these problems, simply upgrading to the right cutting and grinding fluid can dramatically improve grinding processes.

Here’s a breakdown of typical challenges manufacturers may face and how the right cutting fluid can combat them:

  • Poor or inconsistent surface finish: Grinding is often a part finishing process, and it can be difficult to pinpoint the exact cause of poor finish quality in a grinding operation since it could be caused by previous operations. Switching to higher-quality cutting fluid optimized for precision grinding operations can help alleviate many finish quality issues. Fluids with higher lubricity can help grinding wheels achieve a smoother, more polished finish. They also keep grinding wheels clean and minimize the need for wheel dressings.
  • Burning: Thermal damage, or burning, manifests in a variety of ways, including discoloration on the workpiece, surface distortions on the part, and even workpiece hardness. To avoid this threat to productivity, try switching to a cutting fluid with more advanced cooling and lubricity. With a high-performance grinding fluid, operators may be able to increase feed rates or depth of cut, both of which increase productivity.
  • Short wheel life: If the grinding wheel is too hard, too soft, or otherwise mismatched to the material being machined, the wheel could load up or break down faster, resulting in unnecessary machine downtime and higher consumable costs. The right grinding fluid is also essential to maximizing wheel life, as the wrong one could lack the necessary lubricity and cooling.
  • Short fluid life: Grinding operations can create a lot of swarf which can build up in the fluid tanks if not filtered properly. This swarf buildup can lead to bacteria issues and contaminate the grinding fluid quickly. Poor sump life also presents several productivity and material cost issues.

Learn more about the range of MWF fluids we offer for your grinding operation by clicking a metal below:

P Steel

M Stainless Steel

K Cast Iron

N Nonferrous

S Superalloys

Want to get your grinding operation running cleaner, faster, and more efficiently? Click here to get in touch with your nearest distributor who will find just the right metalworking fluid for your operation.

Expand your knowledge while improving your bottom line - check out our selection of grinding blog articles here.

Types of Metalworking Fluids: Coolant & Lubricant

Master Fluid Solutions formulates six main categories of coolants: synthetics, semi synthetics, microemulsions, emulsions, and straight oils as well as neo-synthetics.

For every metal in every operation, there’s the right type of metalworking fluid that will provide the level of cooling and lubrication that will help achieve the best results.

metalworking fluids overview


Due to their little to no oil content, synthetics leave very low residue for easy cleaning.

Paired with extremely low carryoff, synthetics translate to less maintenance and lower operational costs, saving you time and money. Semisynthetics are typically hard-water tolerant with good corrosion protection.

Types of Metal Typically Compatible with Synthetics

P Steel: Typically when machining steel, cooling is more important than lubrication, making a synthetic or semisynthetic the right choice of coolant depending on the hardness of the metal being worked.

M Stainless Steel - Ferritic: Ferritic stainless steels have a similar machining behavior to a steel alloy. When machining this metal, cooling is the primary concern. For that reason, we typically recommend a synthetic or low-oil semisynthetic coolant.

K Cast Iron: Cooling is key when it comes to choosing an MWF for cast iron machining operations. We typically recommend a semisynthetic or low-oil synthetic when machining cast iron.


Click here to see some of the products in our range of synthetics.

Due to their little to no oil content, synthetics leave very low residue for easy cleaning.

Paired with extremely low carryoff, synthetics translate to less maintenance and lower operational costs, saving you time and money. Semisynthetics are typically hard-water tolerant with good corrosion protection.

Types of Metal Typically Compatible with Synthetics

P Steel: Typically when machining steel, cooling is more important than lubrication, making a synthetic or semisynthetic the right choice of coolant depending on the hardness of the metal being worked.

M Stainless Steel - Ferritic: Ferritic stainless steels have a similar machining behavior to a steel alloy. When machining this metal, cooling is the primary concern. For that reason, we typically recommend a synthetic or low-oil semisynthetic coolant.

K Cast Iron: Cooling is key when it comes to choosing an MWF for cast iron machining operations. We typically recommend a semisynthetic or low-oil synthetic when machining cast iron.


Click here to see some of the products in our range of synthetics.

Semisynthetics can offer the cooling and lubricity of a synthetic without the higher oil content of an emulsion.

Designed to operate at higher SFPM (surface feet per minute), semisynthetics perform well on many operations including face milling, cut-off turning, grinding, tapping, and drilling. Semisynthetics are compatible with alloy steels, tool steels, cast irons, copper alloys, as well as plastics and composites. With less carryoff (meaning less MWF is carried away with the chips), semisynthetics use less material which all adds up to lower costs.

Types of Metal Typically Compatible with Semisynthetics

P Steel: Typically when machining steel, cooling is more important than lubrication, making a synthetic or semisynthetic the right choice of coolant depending on the hardness of the metal being worked.

M Stainless Steel - Ferritic: Ferritic stainless steels have a similar machining behavior to a steel alloy. When machining this metal, cooling is the primary concern. For that reason, we typically recommend a synthetic or low-oil semisynthetic coolant.

N Nonferrous - Yellow Metals: For occasional machining, MicroSol microemulsions and semisynthetics typically work well with yellow metals. If yellow metals are your primary metal, contact Master Fluid Solutions to receive specific recommendations.

K Cast Iron: Cooling is key when it comes to choosing an MWF for cast iron machining operations. We typically recommend a semisynthetic or low-oil synthetic when machining cast iron.


Click here to see some of the products in our range of semisynthetic metalworking fluids.

Semisynthetics can offer the cooling and lubricity of a synthetic without the higher oil content of an emulsion.

Designed to operate at higher SFPM (surface feet per minute), semisynthetics perform well on many operations including face milling, cut-off turning, grinding, tapping, and drilling. Semisynthetics are compatible with alloy steels, tool steels, cast irons, copper alloys, as well as plastics and composites. With less carryoff (meaning less MWF is carried away with the chips), semisynthetics use less material which all adds up to lower costs.

Types of Metal Typically Compatible with Semisynthetics

P Steel: Typically when machining steel, cooling is more important than lubrication, making a synthetic or semisynthetic the right choice of coolant depending on the hardness of the metal being worked.

M Stainless Steel - Ferritic: Ferritic stainless steels have a similar machining behavior to a steel alloy. When machining this metal, cooling is the primary concern. For that reason, we typically recommend a synthetic or low-oil semisynthetic coolant.

N Nonferrous - Yellow Metals: For occasional machining, MicroSol microemulsions and semisynthetics typically work well with yellow metals. If yellow metals are your primary metal, contact Master Fluid Solutions to receive specific recommendations.

K Cast Iron: Cooling is key when it comes to choosing an MWF for cast iron machining operations. We typically recommend a semisynthetic or low-oil synthetic when machining cast iron.


Click here to see some of the products in our range of semisynthetic metalworking fluids.

Microemulsions balance the best of both worlds - the lubricity of oil mixed with the cooling capabilities of synthetics - making them the best choice when it comes to precision parts manufacturing.

TRIM MicroSol microemulsions deliver high-performance lubricity and ultimately lower costs by providing higher precision to parts, exceptional tool life, extended sump life, assured regulatory compliance, and greater profitability. Designed to meet the rigorous demands of the aerospace, medical, automotive, and high production, precision parts manufacturing industries, there's a MicroSol microemulsion to answer your concerns, ramp up your production, and boost your bottom line.

Types of Metal Typically Compatible with Microemulsions

M Stainless Steel - Austenitic: When it comes to choosing an MWF, we typically recommend one of our high-oil MicroSol microemulsions to accommodate austenitic stainless steel’s wide range of machinability.

M Stainless Steel - Martensitic: When choosing an MWF for this type of metal, we typically recommend a coolant with a higher oil content, such as one of our emulsions or MicroSol microemulsions.

M Stainless Steel - Precipitation Hardenable: When machining precipitation hardenable stainless steels, we typically recommend using a MicroSol microemulsion with a high oil content.

M Stainless Steel - Duplex: When choosing a MWF for duplex stainless steels, we typically recommend a coolant with a higher oil content, such as one of our emulsions or MicroSol microemulsions.

N Nonferrous - Aluminum and Aluminum Alloys: When choosing an MWF, aluminums are best machined with straight oils, high-oil MicroSol microemulsions, and emulsions.

N Nonferrous - Yellow Metals: For occasional machining, MicroSol microemulsions and semisynthetics typically work well with yellow metals. If yellow metals are your primary metal, contact Master Fluid Solutions to receive specific recommendations.

S Superalloys: Higher lubricity is typically recommended for super alloys including MicroSol microemulsions and emulsions.

S Superalloys - Titanium Alloys: To strike the perfect balance between lubricating and cooling, we recommend a MicroSol microemulsion when working with titanium alloys..


Click here to see some of the products in our range of microemulsion metalworking fluids.


Microemulsions balance the best of both worlds - the lubricity of oil mixed with the cooling capabilities of synthetics - making them the best choice when it comes to precision parts manufacturing.

TRIM MicroSol microemulsions deliver high-performance lubricity and ultimately lower costs by providing higher precision to parts, exceptional tool life, extended sump life, assured regulatory compliance, and greater profitability. Designed to meet the rigorous demands of the aerospace, medical, automotive, and high production, precision parts manufacturing industries, there's a MicroSol microemulsion to answer your concerns, ramp up your production, and boost your bottom line.

Types of Metal Typically Compatible with Microemulsions

M Stainless Steel - Austenitic: When it comes to choosing an MWF, we typically recommend one of our high-oil MicroSol microemulsions to accommodate austenitic stainless steel’s wide range of machinability.

M Stainless Steel - Martensitic: When choosing an MWF for this type of metal, we typically recommend a coolant with a higher oil content, such as one of our emulsions or MicroSol microemulsions.

M Stainless Steel - Precipitation Hardenable: When machining precipitation hardenable stainless steels, we typically recommend using a MicroSol microemulsion with a high oil content.

M Stainless Steel - Duplex: When choosing a MWF for duplex stainless steels, we typically recommend a coolant with a higher oil content, such as one of our emulsions or MicroSol microemulsions.

N Nonferrous - Aluminum and Aluminum Alloys: When choosing an MWF, aluminums are best machined with straight oils, high-oil MicroSol microemulsions, and emulsions.

N Nonferrous - Yellow Metals: For occasional machining, MicroSol microemulsions and semisynthetics typically work well with yellow metals. If yellow metals are your primary metal, contact Master Fluid Solutions to receive specific recommendations.

S Superalloys: Higher lubricity is typically recommended for super alloys including MicroSol microemulsions and emulsions.

S Superalloys - Titanium Alloys: To strike the perfect balance between lubricating and cooling, we recommend a MicroSol microemulsion when working with titanium alloys..


Click here to see some of the products in our range of microemulsion metalworking fluids.


Emulsions are metalworking fluids that have a high oil content (>50%), making them ideal for heavy-duty applications such as broaching, reaming, deep hole drilling, drilling, tapping, and centerless grinding.

With superior lubricity and a higher oil content, TRIM emulsions work well for machining copper, yellow metals, steel alloys, cast aluminums, wrought aluminums, and tough-to-machine titanium and nickel-based alloys.

Types of Metal Typically Compatible with Emulsions

M Stainless Steel - Martensitic: When choosing an MWF for this type of metal, we typically recommend a coolant with a higher oil content, such as one of our emulsions or MicroSol microemulsions.

N Nonferrous - Aluminum and Aluminum Alloys: When choosing an MWF, aluminums are best machined with straight oils, high-oil MicroSol microemulsions, and emulsions.

S Superalloys: Higher lubricity is typically recommended for super alloys including MicroSol microemulsions and emulsions.


Click here to see some of the products in our range of emulsion metalworking fluids.


Emulsions are metalworking fluids that have a high oil content (>50%), making them ideal for heavy-duty applications such as broaching, reaming, deep hole drilling, drilling, tapping, and centerless grinding.

With superior lubricity and a higher oil content, TRIM emulsions work well for machining copper, yellow metals, steel alloys, cast aluminums, wrought aluminums, and tough-to-machine titanium and nickel-based alloys.

Types of Metal Typically Compatible with Emulsions

M Stainless Steel - Martensitic: When choosing an MWF for this type of metal, we typically recommend a coolant with a higher oil content, such as one of our emulsions or MicroSol microemulsions.

N Nonferrous - Aluminum and Aluminum Alloys: When choosing an MWF, aluminums are best machined with straight oils, high-oil MicroSol microemulsions, and emulsions.

S Superalloys: Higher lubricity is typically recommended for super alloys including MicroSol microemulsions and emulsions.


Click here to see some of the products in our range of emulsion metalworking fluids.


Straight oils, also known as neat oils, are used "straight up" without dilution of water.

Straight oils are there for operations that don’t necessarily need cooling but need maximum lubrication instead. Providing maximum lubricity, TRIM straight oils have extreme pressure ability which effectively protects the tool, prolongs its service life, and can obtain extremely high workpiece precision and surface finish. Depending on the specific product, some TRIM straight oils are a high-end blend of various base oils; while others contain extreme-pressure additives to control built-up edge and prolong tool life.

Types of Metal Typically Compatible with Straight Oils

N Nonferrous - Aluminum and Aluminum Alloys: When choosing an MWF, aluminums are best machined with straight oils, high-oil MicroSol microemulsions, and emulsions.


Click here to see some of the products in our range of straight oils.

Straight oils, also known as neat oils, are used "straight up" without dilution of water.

Straight oils are there for operations that don’t necessarily need cooling but need maximum lubrication instead. Providing maximum lubricity, TRIM straight oils have extreme pressure ability which effectively protects the tool, prolongs its service life, and can obtain extremely high workpiece precision and surface finish. Depending on the specific product, some TRIM straight oils are a high-end blend of various base oils; while others contain extreme-pressure additives to control built-up edge and prolong tool life.

Types of Metal Typically Compatible with Straight Oils

N Nonferrous - Aluminum and Aluminum Alloys: When choosing an MWF, aluminums are best machined with straight oils, high-oil MicroSol microemulsions, and emulsions.


Click here to see some of the products in our range of straight oils.


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TRIM from Master Fluid Solutions

Achieve cutting-edge operations with globally-recognized TRIM cutting and grinding fluids.

Utilize TRIM metalworking fluids to reduce labor, downtime, fluid, disposal, and tool costs and ensure code compliance, excellent operator acceptance, provide safer workplaces, and deliver bottom-line savings. Click here to view all our TRIM products.

Part is Cleaned and Protected



As well as manufacturing a range of high-quality metalworking fluids, Master Fluid Solutions also offers a large range of cleaners and corrosion inhibitors, each with its unique abilities to clean and protect machines and parts.

Cleaning with T.A.C.T.

One of the most important steps in the metalworking process is cleaning all the residue and fines off the parts, as well as any remaining MWF. To do this successfully, it’s good to remember these four important elements in the cleaning process: time, agitation, chemical action, and temperature or, as we like to call it, “TACT”.

These four factors should be considered when choosing the best cleaning method for your parts. Spray cleaning focuses on the “A” in “TACT”, agitating the fluid with high-pressure jets. Immersion washers on the other hand focus on both “T”s in “TACT”, immersing parts in a warm bath for extended periods of time.

How long does the cleaning process last?

30 minutes of cleaning is likely to be more successful than 30 seconds.

For the most part, the longer you clean something, the cleaner it will be. When washing parts, this one factor can be very effective, immersing parts for a longer period can be a cost-effective way of getting them clean.

When it comes to cleaning out the machine however, time is something that is less available as machine downtime is very expensive. That’s where a high-quality cleaner comes in, minimizing downtime or even eliminating it completely by adding the cleaner while the machine is still running.

How long does the cleaning process last?

30 minutes of cleaning is likely to be more successful than 30 seconds.

For the most part, the longer you clean something, the cleaner it will be. When washing parts, this one factor can be very effective, immersing parts for a longer period can be a cost-effective way of getting them clean.

When it comes to cleaning out the machine however, time is something that is less available as machine downtime is very expensive. That’s where a high-quality cleaner comes in, minimizing downtime or even eliminating it completely by adding the cleaner while the machine is still running.

Is there some agitation involved?

Movement and agitation such as rubbing your hands together when you wash them help the cleaning process.

When cleaning parts, agitation is a great way to get the job done quickly. This can be done with a spray cleaner, spraying jets of soapy water at the parts to get them clean. This method of cleaning does involve an initial investment into a spray cleaner which may be costly, but for many plants, it is well worth the expense for the time it saves.

When it comes to machine cleaning, agitation may be in the form of a cloth, rag, brush, or a high-speed jet of water. It is however almost impossible to get in and scrub out all those hidden areas. Agitation alone therefore is not enough to get your machine completely clean.

Is there some agitation involved?

Movement and agitation such as rubbing your hands together when you wash them help the cleaning process.

When cleaning parts, agitation is a great way to get the job done quickly. This can be done with a spray cleaner, spraying jets of soapy water at the parts to get them clean. This method of cleaning does involve an initial investment into a spray cleaner which may be costly, but for many plants, it is well worth the expense for the time it saves.

When it comes to machine cleaning, agitation may be in the form of a cloth, rag, brush, or a high-speed jet of water. It is however almost impossible to get in and scrub out all those hidden areas. Agitation alone therefore is not enough to get your machine completely clean.

Do you use soap or only water?

Soap is a chemical but so is water. Using both is usually more beneficial than just one.

The chemicals added during the process are an important factor in cleaning parts and machines. Choosing the right cleaner can mean less time, agitation, and heat is needed to get parts clean, making the process far more efficient and cost-effective.

The same is true for machine cleaning, and it is vital to find a cleaner that strikes the balance between attacking the oils, bio-films, scums, and other nasty stuff quickly and at low temperatures without damaging the machines, machinists, or the parts being made.

Do you use soap or only water?

Soap is a chemical but so is water. Using both is usually more beneficial than just one.

The chemicals added during the process are an important factor in cleaning parts and machines. Choosing the right cleaner can mean less time, agitation, and heat is needed to get parts clean, making the process far more efficient and cost-effective.

The same is true for machine cleaning, and it is vital to find a cleaner that strikes the balance between attacking the oils, bio-films, scums, and other nasty stuff quickly and at low temperatures without damaging the machines, machinists, or the parts being made.

Do you use a cold or warm temperature?

We all know that to get your hands as clean as possible, warm water is better than cold and the same goes for most cleaning.

When cleaning parts, immersion cleaners take advantage of heat as a means of cleaning, immersing the parts in a hot bath to get them clean.

However, when it comes to machine cleaning, you’re pretty much limited to lower temperatures. It’s still important to wash as warm as possible and avoid using cold water to clean machines.

Do you use a cold or warm temperature?

We all know that to get your hands as clean as possible, warm water is better than cold and the same goes for most cleaning.

When cleaning parts, immersion cleaners take advantage of heat as a means of cleaning, immersing the parts in a hot bath to get them clean.

However, when it comes to machine cleaning, you’re pretty much limited to lower temperatures. It’s still important to wash as warm as possible and avoid using cold water to clean machines.

Types of Metalworking Fluids: Cleaners

Master STAGES from Master Fluid Solutions provides the chemistry, namely cleaners, to get your parts spotless and your machines running clean. With the right cleaning fluid, we know that you’ll start seeing reductions in total part costs, scrapped parts, and machine downtime.

Expand your knowledge while improving your bottom line - check out our selection of blog articles all about keeping your plant, parts, and machines clean here.

By flooding parts with the chemical cleaner, spray cleaning offers a fast, effective way to remove soil, coolant, and oil residue from a variety of metals, ranging from aluminum, steels, cast iron, stainless steels, alloys, brass, bronze, copper, to magnesium.

Like a dishwasher, high-pressure spray systems shoot powerful jets of heated solutions from all directions. Utilizing a mixture of water-soluble cleaners or solvents, temperature control, and force, unwanted debris is quickly and efficiently removed.

This type of system is ideal for less intricate parts — but items with complex geometries may present other challenges, as the high-pressure force of the jets may not reach every crevice, leaving contaminants behind to be washed again or cleaned by hand. However, some newer generation sprays feature pressure of upwards of 10,000 psi and washer jets specifically designed to reach into difficult-to-clean parts features.

In general, look for high-pressure spray washers that have several nozzles to reach the complete part, multiple stages such as wash, rinse, and dry, and enough power to remove heavy soils without affecting the metal they’re cleaning. Many cleaning fluids in the Master STAGES catalog offer superior tramp oil resistance, giving them a long sump life. Some products are suitable for use with a wide array of metals, but many are formulated for specific categories, both in terms of safety and providing effective cleaning. Some of our products are even formulated to remove heavy contaminants for applications like rebuild operations.

Master STAGES spray cleaners are specially tailored to do the job quickly, and effectively, with less makeup and no staining of parts. Master STAGES in-process spray cleaners are tough and fast-acting with very low V.O.C.

Offering increased life, good tramp oil rejection, low odor, low foam, low mist, and additional corrosion protection, highly-concentrated Master STAGES spray cleaners produce clean parts while reducing overall costs.

Click here to view our range of spray cleaners, or to get in touch with your nearest distributor who will find just the right spray cleaner for your operation, click here.

By flooding parts with the chemical cleaner, spray cleaning offers a fast, effective way to remove soil, coolant, and oil residue from a variety of metals, ranging from aluminum, steels, cast iron, stainless steels, alloys, brass, bronze, copper, to magnesium.

Like a dishwasher, high-pressure spray systems shoot powerful jets of heated solutions from all directions. Utilizing a mixture of water-soluble cleaners or solvents, temperature control, and force, unwanted debris is quickly and efficiently removed.

This type of system is ideal for less intricate parts — but items with complex geometries may present other challenges, as the high-pressure force of the jets may not reach every crevice, leaving contaminants behind to be washed again or cleaned by hand. However, some newer generation sprays feature pressure of upwards of 10,000 psi and washer jets specifically designed to reach into difficult-to-clean parts features.

In general, look for high-pressure spray washers that have several nozzles to reach the complete part, multiple stages such as wash, rinse, and dry, and enough power to remove heavy soils without affecting the metal they’re cleaning. Many cleaning fluids in the Master STAGES catalog offer superior tramp oil resistance, giving them a long sump life. Some products are suitable for use with a wide array of metals, but many are formulated for specific categories, both in terms of safety and providing effective cleaning. Some of our products are even formulated to remove heavy contaminants for applications like rebuild operations.

Master STAGES spray cleaners are specially tailored to do the job quickly, and effectively, with less makeup and no staining of parts. Master STAGES in-process spray cleaners are tough and fast-acting with very low V.O.C.

Offering increased life, good tramp oil rejection, low odor, low foam, low mist, and additional corrosion protection, highly-concentrated Master STAGES spray cleaners produce clean parts while reducing overall costs.

Click here to view our range of spray cleaners, or to get in touch with your nearest distributor who will find just the right spray cleaner for your operation, click here.

Immersion washers effectively remove residue from light to heavy soils, light rust, coolant, oil, drawing compounds, lubricants, waxy soil, and corrosion inhibitors by submerging the parts into a diluted cleaner.

Immersion cleaners operate on a principle similar to ultrasonic cleaners, except the agitation is caused by moving the workpieces themselves, or the flow of the cleaning fluid. Parts are immersed in a bath on top of a reciprocating or dunk-style platform. As the platform moves up and down or side to side, the drag against the cleaning solution generates friction that pulls dirt and other contaminants off the surface of the metal. This method doesn’t clean as quickly as ultrasonic machines, but it’s less expensive than the other cleaner styles, especially for larger parts and contaminants that may need to soak in the fluid to loosen the grime.

Various solutions can be used for immersion cleaning, but in general, you should look for versatile fluids designed to remove the toughest greases and oils. Highly concentrated cleaners are ideal for this, as they can be mixed at lower concentrations for reduced chemical usage.

Designed for cleaning aluminum, steels, cast iron, stainless steels, alloys, brass, bronze, copper, and magnesium and for multiple-metal situations, Master STAGES highly concentrated cleaners allow immersion washers to run at lower concentrations and lower temperatures with increased bath life, less foam, and added corrosion protection.

Environmentally friendly, cost-effective Master STAGES immersion cleaners ensure exceptional parts cleaning while using less product and less energy - for a better bottom line.

Click here to view our range of immersion cleaning fluids, or to get in touch with your nearest distributor who will find just the right immersion cleaner for your operation, click here.

Immersion washers effectively remove residue from light to heavy soils, light rust, coolant, oil, drawing compounds, lubricants, waxy soil, and corrosion inhibitors by submerging the parts into a diluted cleaner.

Immersion cleaners operate on a principle similar to ultrasonic cleaners, except the agitation is caused by moving the workpieces themselves, or the flow of the cleaning fluid. Parts are immersed in a bath on top of a reciprocating or dunk-style platform. As the platform moves up and down or side to side, the drag against the cleaning solution generates friction that pulls dirt and other contaminants off the surface of the metal. This method doesn’t clean as quickly as ultrasonic machines, but it’s less expensive than the other cleaner styles, especially for larger parts and contaminants that may need to soak in the fluid to loosen the grime.

Various solutions can be used for immersion cleaning, but in general, you should look for versatile fluids designed to remove the toughest greases and oils. Highly concentrated cleaners are ideal for this, as they can be mixed at lower concentrations for reduced chemical usage.

Designed for cleaning aluminum, steels, cast iron, stainless steels, alloys, brass, bronze, copper, and magnesium and for multiple-metal situations, Master STAGES highly concentrated cleaners allow immersion washers to run at lower concentrations and lower temperatures with increased bath life, less foam, and added corrosion protection.

Environmentally friendly, cost-effective Master STAGES immersion cleaners ensure exceptional parts cleaning while using less product and less energy - for a better bottom line.

Click here to view our range of immersion cleaning fluids, or to get in touch with your nearest distributor who will find just the right immersion cleaner for your operation, click here.

Ultrasonic parts washers - widely used in the medical, aerospace, automotive, mining, energy, and precision parts industries - provide superior cleaning performance to all parts, even those with complex geometries.

Once parts are submerged in a bath with an ultrasound-generating transducer, the high-frequency vibration produces microscopic “cavities” in the liquid around the parts creating agitation that scrubs off debris and contaminants. This method removes even the toughest debris, leaving a pristine surface finish.

Looking for ultrasonic cleaning solutions that have exceptional wetting ability will ensure parts are cleaned faster, which helps reduce cycle time. Plus, find products that rapidly split oils, bringing them to the surface during the cleaning process so that the contaminants can then be skimmed or removed off the top of the cleaner bath to extend fluid life.

Master STAGES specifically developed ultrasonic in-process cleaners are highly effective in removing dirt, oils, rust, bacteria, grease, drawing compounds, waxy soil, and other contaminants from a wide variety of metals including aluminum, steels, cast iron, stainless steels, alloys, brass, bronze, copper, or magnesium. Offering exceptional wetting ability, reduced cycle times, longer bath life, and faster, safer precision parts cleaning, yet are environmentally friendly, Master STAGES ultrasonic cleaners are the cost-effective solution to achieving a matchless surface finish.

Click here to view our range of ultrasonic cleaners, or to get in touch with your nearest distributor who will find just the right ultrasonic cleaner for your operation, click here.

Ultrasonic parts washers - widely used in the medical, aerospace, automotive, mining, energy, and precision parts industries - provide superior cleaning performance to all parts, even those with complex geometries.

Once parts are submerged in a bath with an ultrasound-generating transducer, the high-frequency vibration produces microscopic “cavities” in the liquid around the parts creating agitation that scrubs off debris and contaminants. This method removes even the toughest debris, leaving a pristine surface finish.

Looking for ultrasonic cleaning solutions that have exceptional wetting ability will ensure parts are cleaned faster, which helps reduce cycle time. Plus, find products that rapidly split oils, bringing them to the surface during the cleaning process so that the contaminants can then be skimmed or removed off the top of the cleaner bath to extend fluid life.

Master STAGES specifically developed ultrasonic in-process cleaners are highly effective in removing dirt, oils, rust, bacteria, grease, drawing compounds, waxy soil, and other contaminants from a wide variety of metals including aluminum, steels, cast iron, stainless steels, alloys, brass, bronze, copper, or magnesium. Offering exceptional wetting ability, reduced cycle times, longer bath life, and faster, safer precision parts cleaning, yet are environmentally friendly, Master STAGES ultrasonic cleaners are the cost-effective solution to achieving a matchless surface finish.

Click here to view our range of ultrasonic cleaners, or to get in touch with your nearest distributor who will find just the right ultrasonic cleaner for your operation, click here.

Whether cleaning true grit or light soils from machines, work surfaces, glass, or floors, there's a highly concentrated, cost-effective maintenance cleaner to get the job done and save hours of maintenance.

Master STAGES highly concentrated sump and central system cleaners for interim and full cleanouts extend sump life and greatly reduce downtime. All Master STAGES environmentally-friendly products are safe for human contact and free of harmful and corrosive chemicals.

Click here to view our range of maintenance cleaning fluids, or to get in touch with your nearest distributor who will find just the right maintenance cleaner for your operation, click here.

Whether cleaning true grit or light soils from machines, work surfaces, glass, or floors, there's a highly concentrated, cost-effective maintenance cleaner to get the job done and save hours of maintenance.

Master STAGES highly concentrated sump and central system cleaners for interim and full cleanouts extend sump life and greatly reduce downtime. All Master STAGES environmentally-friendly products are safe for human contact and free of harmful and corrosive chemicals.

Click here to view our range of maintenance cleaning fluids, or to get in touch with your nearest distributor who will find just the right maintenance cleaner for your operation, click here.

Types of Metalworking Fluids: Corrosion Inhibitors

Whether your parts need indoor corrosion protection during interim steps of the production process, long-term outdoor protection, or for shipping parts overseas, using a corrosion inhibitor ensures that the parts are protected during their time in the plant and continue being protected all the way to your customer and beyond. When parts begin to corrode, it leads to scrap, waste, and unhappy customers, inevitably costing time and money and negatively impacting the bottom line.

Here are some of the qualities to expect from next-generation rust prevention:

  • Environmentally friendly formulas: Traditional corrosion inhibitor fluids can be toxic for the environment and people, largely because of the high quantities of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) they release into the atmosphere. Next-generation corrosion inhibitors are low- or VOC-free, and the environmentally friendly formulations have higher flashpoints, which promotes a safer shop environment and reduces the release of organic compounds into the atmosphere.
  • Faster dewatering: Many next-generation corrosion inhibitors feature higher hydrophobic characteristics, which reduce dewatering times.
  • High-Quality, multi-purpose capabilities: Many next-generation corrosion inhibitors are formulated to replace and consolidate various products into a single solution offering long-term corrosion protection and enough lubricity to effectively serve as forming fluids. These advanced, multi-purpose formulations improve productivity by reducing the number of products and steps needed in an operation.
  • Optimized for specific manufacturing processes: Many multi-purpose formulations are optimized for specific manufacturing processes, responding to the needs of a specific industry — especially automotive and other stamped part manufacturers. These fluids can also help manufacturers innovate and streamline the way they produce parts. When enough industry leaders achieve a higher level of productivity, it creates new industry standards, setting the stage for greater innovations.
  • Protect parts with highly effective water-soluble or oil/solvent-based corrosion inhibitors from Master STAGES that provide excellent protection on metals ranging from cast iron, steels, and other ferrous metals. Master STAGES corrosion inhibitors can be applied by dip, flood coating, ambient-temperature or heated spraying, roller, or brush and are easily removed.

    Click here to view our range of highly-effective Master STAGES corrosion inhibitors, or to get in touch with your nearest distributor who will find just the right maintenance cleaner for your operation, click here.

    Expand your knowledge while improving your bottom line - check out our selection of blog articles about corrosion here.


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Master STAGES from Master Fluid Solutions

To clean and protect, rely on hard-working Master STAGES cleaners and rust preventatives.

Master STAGES metalworking fluids provide excellent cleaning in spray, immersion, or ultrasonic parts vibratory finishing applications and perform multi-metal operations, protect parts from corrosion, and reduce disposal costs. Click here to view all our Master STAGES products.

Machine is Cleaned and Maintained



Excess contaminants in the coolant such as grease, lube oils, chips and swarf, unwanted residue, tramp oil, and sludge not only create problems for the machine itself, they can significantly reduce coolant sump life. What's more, they feed bacteria and fungi causing odor and dermatitis; they play havoc with machinery, clogging filters and lines; and they degrade coolant which can lead to corrosion. When the unwanted "sludge" becomes too much, it's time for a cleanout, which means machine downtime, costing you time and money. To make matters worse, cleaning out a machine is no simple task, especially if you have the sort of machines that were not designed with cleaning in mind.





There is however a way to avoid a build-up of sludge and that is through proper fluid management, keeping your machines running at an optimal level. That’s where a partnership with Master Fluid Solutions comes in, with a full-service solution to make sure every element of your fluid system is running correctly.

The First Step in Better Fluid Management

When you buy a product from us, you’re not just buying a drum of metalworking fluid or a piece of equipment. There’s so much more that goes on “behind the drum” to ensure that you are managing your fluids to an optimal level.

Coolant management is not just about buying a range of equipment. That is, in fact, the last step in the process. Before that comes fluid management training to gain a proper understanding of how to manage the systems that keep coolant running at its peak.

Master Fluid Solutions is there to train your team on how to effectively conduct clean-outs and manage coolant maintenance systems and makeup systems. Once we bring your team up to speed, you will be managing MWFs efficiently and effectively, ensuring you get the most out of every drop of coolant.

Click here to contact your nearest distributor and take the first step today.

Maintaining the Right Fluid Concentrations

The simplest way to get your metalworking fluid working at its optimal performance and to avoid issues such as foam, corrosion, and dermatitis is to check and maintain the correct coolant concentrations. The majority of metalworking fluids have a specific concentration they need to run at. Most Master Fluid Solutions metalworking fluids run between 8-10%. Maintaining that concentration doesn't involve just making up 8-10% each time and adding it to the machine. When adding coolant regularly, the additional coolant should normally be at around 2-3% concentration because as the water in the machine evaporates, the concentration level increases. Therefore, less coolant needs to be added to maintain that 8-10% concentration.

The best way to check concentrations is with a digital refractometer that will tell you the concentration in the machine, and by using our handy Coolant Makeup Calculator where you can find out the exact concentration to add based on the fluid you’re using and a refractometer reading from your machine.



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XYBEX from Master Fluid Solutions

Maximize productivity, minimize waste, and dramatically reduce costs with XYBEX fluid management solutions

With a proper coolant management system, XYBEX equipment virtually pays for itself with dramatically reduced coolant use, disposal cost, and downtime. From job shop to mega-manufacturer, there’s XYBEX equipment to improve your bottom line. Click here to view all our XYBEX products.

Part is Stored and Transported


Wondering how you’ll keep parts clean and corrosion-free when storing and transporting them?

Here’s how:

  • Our corrosion inhibitors leave a light and easily-removed film on the parts.
  • Easily apply one of our corrosion preventatives by various methods listed on its data sheet.
  • Parts are protected indoors and during transit.

From the moment a part is cut to the moment it arrives to your customer and beyond, trust Master STAGES to keep your part clean and protected.

Metalworking Challenges Solved by Master Fluid Solutions



Metalworking fluids from Master Fluid Solutions are the number one solution to a variety of metalworking challenges. From the constant fight against rust, odor, and tramp oil on the shop floor, to the C-suite strategic challenges of reducing costs while maintaining sustainability, we’ve got you covered.





In the following section, we have outlined many key issues with a plethora of tips, solutions, and resources. From the daily struggles on the shop floor to the make-or-break decisions in the C-Suite, from the challenges faced in the aerospace industry to those faced in the medical industry - Master Fluid Solutions has got you covered.

Executive Challenges

Metalworking fluid is often seen as a matter for operators and shop floor managers alone, having little effect on the strategic side of a metalworking company. This is a mistake.

Metalworking fluid touches every part of the process, and it can mean the difference between having a plant that works highly efficiently, delivering high-quality and well-finished parts to happy customers, and a plant that wastes huge amounts of time, money, and resources on fixing the many issues caused by low-quality metalworking fluids.

Integrating sustainability into every aspect of your business not only ensures long-term success, it also makes a positive impact on the world - something every company should be striving for. But being a sustainable company isn't something that happens overnight - it takes many little steps in the right direction to make it happen. Here are a few ways your company can become more sustainable:

  • Environmental responsibility: Recognizing the impact your company's operations have on the environment, and beginning to minimizing that impact. This includes reducing carbon footprint, conserving resources, and preventing pollution.
  • Innovation and efficiency: Finding creative solutions that improve efficiency, reduce waste, and drive sustainable growth.
  • Employee well-being: Creating a safe, inclusive, and supportive work environment that nurtures talent and fosters personal and professional growth.
  • Community engagement: Being responsible and contributing members of the larger community, and actively engaging with and giving back to the communities where you operate.
  • Transparency and accountability: Being accountable for sustainability goals and outcomes.

Choosing Master Fluid Solutions means creating a partnership with a company that prides itself on its sustainable solutions, taking you a step closer to your sustainability goals.

Want to learn more about how choosing our metalworking fluid is a sustainable choice? Speak to one of our experts at Master Fluid Solutions or contact your nearest distributor.

Expand your knowledge while improving your bottom line - check out our selection of blog articles about sustainability here.

Integrating sustainability into every aspect of your business not only ensures long-term success, it also makes a positive impact on the world - something every company should be striving for. But being a sustainable company isn't something that happens overnight - it takes many little steps in the right direction to make it happen. Here are a few ways your company can become more sustainable:

  • Environmental responsibility: Recognizing the impact your company's operations have on the environment, and beginning to minimizing that impact. This includes reducing carbon footprint, conserving resources, and preventing pollution.
  • Innovation and efficiency: Finding creative solutions that improve efficiency, reduce waste, and drive sustainable growth.
  • Employee well-being: Creating a safe, inclusive, and supportive work environment that nurtures talent and fosters personal and professional growth.
  • Community engagement: Being responsible and contributing members of the larger community, and actively engaging with and giving back to the communities where you operate.
  • Transparency and accountability: Being accountable for sustainability goals and outcomes.

Choosing Master Fluid Solutions means creating a partnership with a company that prides itself on its sustainable solutions, taking you a step closer to your sustainability goals.

Want to learn more about how choosing our metalworking fluid is a sustainable choice? Speak to one of our experts at Master Fluid Solutions or contact your nearest distributor.

Expand your knowledge while improving your bottom line - check out our selection of blog articles about sustainability here.

Shop Floor Challenges

It can sometimes feel like the daily problems in a plant are never-ending, whether it be a machine not working the way it should, a blocked pump, a bad case of dermatitis, or a bad smell you just can’t seem to get rid of.

Master Fluid Solutions is here to support you in getting your plant running cleaner, more efficiently, and producing better-quality parts.